Tag Archives: Baseball

Batter Up, Word Wonks!

It’s October, and to baseball fans and the Boys of Summer (i.e., baseball players) this month is synonymous with the baseball postseason – and this year, that’s especially true in Toronto. The playoffs and the World Series are the culmination of a hard-fought, six-month campaign – or, what often seems to non-enthusiasts like a painfully long, 162-game season.BaseballImage1.jpg

In honour of the Toronto Blue Jays — and the other teams unlucky enough to face them in the playoffs – let’s look, once again, at some of the oddball terminology used in baseball, with thanks to the Dickson Baseball Dictionary:

  • Boys in Blue – The umpires. The term was borrowed from the nickname given both to Union soldiers during the American Civil War and to modern police forces, based on their blue uniforms.
  • Ducks on the Pond – Runners on base. The term was introduced to baseball in 1939 by a broadcaster, Arch McDonald, himself colourfully called the Barnum of the Bushes.
  • Four Bagger – A home run. The term derives from the necessity for the hitter to circle the bases and touch all four bases – which are referred to as bags — before he scores the run.
  • Money Player – A player who performs at his best when there is a lot on the line.
  • Moon Shot – A home run. This slang term merged perfectly with baseball’s penchant for statistics in 1986 when statisticians determined that former Philadelphia Phillies slugger Mike Schmidt did his best hitting when the moon was full.
  • Speed Merchant – A particularly fast runner who is likely to steal bases. The term can be traced back to Baseball magazine in 1910.
  • The Mendoza Line – Pity poor Mario Mendoza. The shortstop, who played eight years total for three teams in the major leagues and had a career batting average of .215, low by professional standards. The term is actually used to refer to any major leaguer whose batting average is below .200, embarrassing for any pro.

And, last but not least, for Blue Jays fans:

  • The Mistake on the Lake – Cleveland, referring to a city that was generally, until this year’s NBA basketball championship, unlucky in sports. Canadians can only hope the bad luck continues!

Let’s go, Blue Jays!

 

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Let’s Play Ball, Language Lovers!

As all of Canada began cheering, “Go, Jays, Go,” at the start of the Toronto Blue Jays’ 2016 Major League Baseball season, my thoughts turned to team names and their intimidation factor.

blue-jay-1238211_640Historically, many team names were chosen to exude a strength that caused their opponents to shudder.The blue jay may not be a muscular, frightening creature like a tiger, but at least, jays strike fear in the hearts of other avian species with their sneaky, destructive ways.

By comparison, pity the poor baseball player who opens the season in the minor leagues. It’s likely that he will be wearing a uniform featuring an oddball creature such as a grasshopper (Greensboro, North Carolina) or a Flying Squirrel (Richmond, Virginia). Great for marketing, but tough on the ego!

Minor League Marketing

Minor league teams are generally farm teams for the major league clubs. Minor league management signs contracts with the big guys to train players on their behalf. The minor league affiliates benefit from a steady supply of potential future stars, but one of the problems they have is that the talented players can be called up at any time to the next level of play. They can’t bank on their stars being around for an entire season, so they look to catchy names, branded gear and clever promotions to fill the ballpark seats.

“The minor leagues are all about cheesiness and entertainment,” wrote Brandon McClintock, a correspondent for Major League Baseball. “One of the wackiest, and greatest, things associated with minor league baseball are the team names.”

Offbeat Monikers

The Blue Jays can relate to this assertion since their Single-A affiliate is named the Lansing Lugnuts. Lansing, Michigan, is part of the massive automotive empire that once fanned out from Detroit, and lugnuts are essential for holding wheels in place. A local association and a lively name: who wouldn’t want to own a Lugnuts T-shirt or pay a visit to the ballpark?

Lugnuts players should rejoice that they don’t play in Montgomery, Alabama. The Tampa Bay Rays AA team in this Southern city is called the Montgomery Biscuits. Sure, I love biscuits and gravy, but wearing one on my uniform? What is the team cheer, I wonder? “C’mon, Buttermilk”?  Or “We rise to the occasion?”

rubber-duck-248093_640Residents of Akron, Ohio, don’t have much better luck. Their AA team, an affiliate of the nearby Cleveland Indians, is called the Akron Rubber Ducks. The name pays homage to the local rubber industry that produces automobile tires, but wasn’t there a more fearsome way to do so? Do the players threaten to drown opponents in the bathtub?

Animation Appreciation

At least, the ballplayers in Albuquerque, New Mexico, have a fashionable, funny story to explain their oddball team name, the Albuquerque Isotopes. The Colorado Rockies’ AAA affiliate takes its name from an episode of the popular television series, the Simpsons.

In this animated comedy series, Homer Simpson, the family’s father figure, works at the Springfield, Massachusetts, nuclear plant. The Hungry, Hungry Homer episode homes in on his dismay at the possibility that the town’s baseball team, the Springfield Isotopes, will be moving to Albuquerque. When the city of Albuquerque needed a name for its minor league team, the amused owners called it the Isotopes in a case of life imitating art. At least, the players can proudly boast, “We’re da’ bomb!”

Of course, I’m looking at the names from a player’s point of view. The same names that cause grown men to shudder as they sport the team logo on their chests are a marketer’s dream. They’re unique and interesting, and they draw baseball fans from other cities to the ballpark to enjoy their curiosity and buy their merchandise. I’m sure there are few complaints at the cash register.

So, Blue Jays fans, what do you say? Would you rather be cheering a dust devil (Tri Cities, Washington) or a Mudhen (Toledo, Ohio) instead?

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The “Berra” Best of Yogi — Word(s) of Wisdom

Yogi Berra, the Hall-of-Fame Yankees catcher, was also known by his teammates and his fans as something of a cockeyed philosopher. Some of his famous observations on life were paradoxes, contradicting themselves, while others just didn’t seem to add up, either mathematically or logically. Yet Yogiisms, as they are commonly known, generally bring a smile to the faces of those who hear them.Yogi_Berra_1956

Some of his folk wisdom has stuck and become a part of our modern lexicon. Which sports fan, watching a team fall behind, hasn’t quoted Yogi, saying, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over?” It’s a statement that seems obvious, until you think about the meaning: Don’t give up on the team until the last play, because miracles happen. And who could disagree with Yogi’s sentiment that “Love is the most important thing in the world, but baseball is pretty good, too?”

The thoughtful Yogi, however, is often forgotten in favour of the confusing Yogi, with amusing or paradoxical statements such as:

  • “Baseball is 90 per cent mental — the other half is physical.”
  • “Nobody goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.”
  • “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.”
  • “You can observe a lot by just watching.”
  • “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”

As wise as a Hindu yogi? You decide.

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Play Ball! — Word(s) of Wisdom

The baseball season officially opened this week in cities across North America – another sure sign of spring.

Baseball is a sport with a rich history and culture, as well as a loyal fan base. Evidence of its popularity can be seen in the way some of its expressions have leaked into the English language as jargon, taking on new meanings. Some of them have become so ingrained, speakers don’t even think about their baseball origins.

Take, for example, the phrase Hit One Out of the Park. In baseball, it refers to a batter who hits a homerun and scores for his team. In the business world, it refers to someone who has turned a task or a project into a big success.

Or consider the term Batting 1,000. In baseball, it refers to someone who has a hit every time he bats, which is impossibility throughout a long season. In business, however, the phrase describes someone who is on target or doing an excellent job on a project.

Do you use any baseball jargon in your everyday conversation? Or is this whole essay too Inside Baseball (specialized) for you?

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